Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference and Exhibition on Automobile Engineering Valencia, Spain.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Dr. Lara Carlson

University of New England, USA

Keynote: More Than Just Turning Left: Physiological Responses of Motorsports Drivers

Time : 09:35 - 10:00

OMICS International Automobile 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Lara Carlson photo
Biography:

Dr. Lara Carlson is an Associate Professor at the University of New England and has a faculty appointment with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Outside the classroom, Carlson was an U.S. ranked hammer thrower qualifying and competing in four USA Outdoor Track and Field National Championships. Carlson is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, a 2011 recipient of the American College of Sports Medicine New England Chapter (NEACSM) Honor Award, and has recently been elected President of the NEACSM for an unprecedented second term. Her primary research interests include resistance exercise, and she has a special interest in the physiological challenges observed in automobile racing.

Abstract:

Heat strain experienced by motorsport athletes competing in National Association for Stock Car Automobile Racing (NASCAR) may be significant enough to impair performance or even result in a life-threatening accident. Unfortunately, heat strain during actual NASCAR race competitions has not been carefully quantified. The purpose of this investigation was to quantify the thermoregulatory and physiological strain associated with competitive stock car driving. Eight male stock car drivers (29 + 10 yr; 176.2 + 3.3 cm, 80.6 ± 15.7 kg, 17.5 ± 5.1 % fat) participated in sanctioned stock car races. Physiological measurements included intestinal core (Tc) and skin (Tsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), blood pressure, and body mass before and after completion of the race. Pre-race Tc was 38.1 ± 0.1°C which increased to 38.6 ± 0.2°C post-race (p<0.05). Tsk increased from 36.1 ± 0.2°C pre-race to 37.3 ± 0.3°C post-race (p<0.05) whereas the core-to-skin temperature gradient decreased from a pre-race value of 1.96 ± 0.3°C to 1.28 ± 0.3°C post-race (p<0.05). HRs post-race were 80 ± 0.1% of the drivers’ age-predicted maximum HR. Heat strain associated with driving a stock car is significant. These findings suggest the need for heat mitigation practices and provide evidence that motorsport should consider strategies to improve cardiovascular fitness and acclimatization to better meet the thermoregulatory and cardiovascular challenges of motorsport competition.

  • Automotive Human Factors and Ergonomics, Digital techniques in Automotive Manufacturing Process, Advanced Safety Technologies, Fuel Economy and Emissions, Manufacturing Technologies and Testing, Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) Engineering, Vehicle Design and In-Vehicle Electronics
Location: Meliá Valencia
Speaker

Chair

Dr. Lara Carlson

University of New England

Speaker

Co-Chair

Dr. Kadir Aydin

Çukurova University

Session Introduction

Kadir Genc

Valeo Automotive Systems Industry, Turkey

Title: Development of stamping technology in automotive and production speed calculations

Time : 11:10 - 11:30

Speaker
Biography:

Kadir Genc has completed his Mechanical Engineering at the age of 25 years from Zonguldak Karaelmas University and he is a student of Msc on Automotive Engineering at Bursa Uludag University and Business Administration student at Eskisehir Anadolu University now (Double Major Programme). He is Production Supervisor of Valeo, an automotive systems company. He has published this article at a technical university in Turkey due to approvement of impartial technical arbitration tribunal.

Abstract:

Automotive industry has developed rapidly in the last 50 years but before this development; machinery was the most important substructure for this industry. For the centuries, people found new resources for living an easy life but to reach them, transportation was the first degree requirement. So they developed engines to do that. After that they make covers and seats to use it for transportation. In the beginning of this, they used hammers to make covers. Humankind liked this easiness and some people had this vehicles. But it’s not enough to produce this vehicle for everybody. That’s they started to develop machinery and it’s called by ‘press’. This system was enough to give shape to the steels and other components by minimum labor but they saw that big parts need strong transportation. So they developed robots to decrease labor for transportation. By the time robot technology was not enough the reach the production speed they want. So transfer press’s been developed. In this development safety was more important than the speed. So automotive industry started to use more strong steels for production. But cold stamping press was not enough strong to produce that. So they developed hot stamping technology. This research summaries; technology and automation development in manufacturing, their technical details, softwares and their history, safety improvements in all the time, methods on increasing production speed. That’s why some calculations and formulas’ve been created to improve these values. All formulas and calculations’ve been created by this article owner Kadir Genc.

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Sergei Gontscharov received his degree at the Universität Bremen at the age of 28. He started his doctoral research work in 2012. Currently, he is a scientific researcher in the working group "Automotive Electronic Systems" at the Institute of Electrodynamics and Microelectronics (ITEM), Universität Bremen. He has published more than 10 papers at German and international conferences and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute. His dissertation deals with the algorithm design for a subsequent reasoning framework stage in an application for minor damage identification in vehicle’s electronic control unit.

Abstract:

An automatic damage identification system in vehicles helps car sharing and car rental companies to monitor damage as it happens and to attribute it to a responsible person. The working group "Automotive Electronic Systems" at the Institute of Electrodynamics and Microelectronics (ITEM), Universität Bremen, initiated in early 2012 the joint project KESS – Konfigurierbares Elektronisches SchadenidentifikationsSystem, engl.: Configurable Electronic Damage Identification System – funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The innovative damage identification system developed in this project offers transparency to car sharing/car rental businesses and their customers. KESS detects and documents in real time minor damages - such as dents and scratches - that happen during usage a car through the customer or through vandalism. First, a technical overview about the complete workflow in such a system is part of talk. Starting with the detected raw signals of structure-borne sounds (sensor data acquisition), through to signal evaluation and algorithmic assessment of the characteristic indicators for damage (signal filtering and feature extraction), to wireless data transmission of the registered damage to the damage management system of the car fleet owner (information flow and communication). This contribution focuses on two different approaches for algorithm design of the subsequent reasoning framework stage in a main electronic unit. Both ways make it easier to decide which final result of the damage assessment should be transmitted to the fleet management server.

Xavier Guerrero-Pich

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain

Title: Numerical Study on Active Flow Control using Synthetic Jet Actuators over a NACA 4421 Airfoil

Time : 10:40 - 11:00

Speaker
Biography:

Ing. Xavier Guerrero has obtained at the age of 21 his Bachelor degree in Aeronautical Engineering at ETSEIAT-UPC. Dr. Ing. JM Bergadà. Mechanical Engineer (1990), PhD in Mechanical Engineering (1996). From 1990 to 2010 his research field was Fluid Power, having spent over 10 years 2000-2010, collaborating with the Mechanical Engineering department at Cardiff University UK. During the last 5 years 2010-2015, his research focuses on theoretical and computational Fluid Mechanics. He has over 25 years of experience at UPC Fluid Mechanics Department. Dr. David del Campo Aerospace Engineer. PhD in Fluid Mechanics. Lecturer at the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering of the Technical University of Catalonia (Terrassa, Spain). His main research area is Computational Fluid Dynamics applied to flow control devices. Dr. Vanessa Del Campo has been working for the Aerospace Department at the UPC (Barcelona) for more than six years. PhD on experimental Aerodynamics and Wind Turbines, carried out at Rutgers University (USA) and TUDelft (Holland). She is actually investigating flow control devices within the Research Group L’Aire. She studied Aerospace Engineering at the UPM (Madrid) and RWTH (Aachen).

Abstract:

This paper presents the effects of using a Zero Net Mass Flux actuator (ZNMF) on a baseline 21-percent thick NACA 4421 airfoil for stall delay. The first part of the study presents the comparison of the CFD simulations with the available experimental data of the airfoil without considering the actuation of ZNMF. A very good agreement of the CFD simulations was obtained for the lift curve, therefore validating the CFD model used. The original lift curve presented a stall around 13º angle of attack, this is why a range of angles of attack (α) near this value were studied at 7º ≤𝛼 ≤ 14º. In the second part of the study, the ZNMF was set up in the airfoil. The slot position was located at 17% of the chord, while its length was established in 2 mm. The ZNMF performance was studied at three different frequencies (𝑓=45 𝐻𝑧,250 𝐻𝑧,500 𝐻𝑧), the lower one corresponds to the shedding frequency when the angle of attack was 7º. During the study the following parameters were kept constant, Reynolds number based on the chord length was 𝑅𝑒=3•106, velocity ratio was 𝑉𝑚𝑒𝑎𝑛𝑈∞=0.701, and momentum coefficient based on the half period mean velocity, was 𝑐𝜇=0.03%. The results show a separation point downstream displacement of 4% versus the original position, whenever the frequency was 45 Hz, the rest of the frequencies studied produced an upstream displacement of the separation point. In addition, when studying the lift coefficient under dynamic conditions, it was observed that the oscillation amplitude suffered a small decrease when the ZNMF actuation frequency was 45 Hz.

Veronel George Jacota

Universitatea Politehnica din București, Romania

Title: Evaluation the dissipated energy by the automobile dampers

Time : 12:50 - 13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Veronel-George Jacota has completed his master at the age of 25 years from Universitatea Politehnica din București. Since the 2014 he is the PhD at the Polytechnic University of Bucharest, in the field of Automotive Engineering, in first year, where the domain is represented by the recovery of dissipated energy by the automotive suspension dampers. For this activity he has developed an interest regarding the fuel consumption, using the innovative and sustainable technical definitions, to create the new competitive cars who complies the latest pollution requirements. Actually his workplace is the designer of gearbox external gearshift, at the Renault Technologies Romania.

Abstract:

The automotive industry is one of the most important sectors of the global economy, where the number of cars manufactured increase every year. Attracting the new customers, selling a larger number of models and respect the pollution standards, require the changes for all the cars subassemblies. Each subset of the car is itself a source of recovery the energy. From braking system until the aerodynamics, the car manufacturers trying to reduce the fuel consumption, without affecting the dynamics performances. The most important directions adopted in this sense are represented by the car weight reducing, solution applied for the engine, using the modern transmission and the hybrid traction systems, optimization the aerodynamic, reducing the rolling resistance of the tires. All these improvements can reduce the fuel consumption between 2% and 40%, but with financial and intellectual efforts, until the price of the new technologies becomes accessible for the car manufactures and the customers. One of the automotive subassemblies who represent a potential continuously source of power is represented by the suspensions dampers, as long the car is in motion. The energy dissipated by the dampers suspensions can be converted into electrical energy using an electric generator instead damper or can be converted into pressure energy by using a pneumatic or hydraulic system. The parameters used to appreciate the dissipated energy are: the road profile, the car parameters, the suspension parameters and the simulation conditions. The road profile contain two components: the microstructure, who is represented by the road irregularities and the macrostructure, who is characterized by the longitudinal gradients and radius. The combination of these combination provide 27 road profiles, characterized by the maximum speed. The car parameters contain the masses and the longitudinal position of the mass center. The suspension parameters include the masses, suspension spring rate, suspension damping, tire stiffness tire damping and the road excitation. The simulation conditions contain the length of road, cross profile, speed variation. Simulation of suspension system and evaluation of dissipated energy by the system highlights the potential of the car operation mode, where the suspension can provide a significant amount of power. A roughness road profile and a car with elastic suspension springs and stiff dampers can provide significant energy. This energy varies between 4% and 8% of the energy consumed by the engine vehicle, considering the road speed profiles below 60 km/h and a vehicle with reduced rolling resistance and drag coefficient.

Diana Reich

Technische Universität Berlin, Germany

Title: Comparison of Immersive and Non-Immersive Driving Task Environments

Time : 10:40 - 11:10

Speaker
Biography:

Diana Reich has completed her bachelor degree in Psychology at the TU Chemnitz and her master degree in Human Factors at the TU Berlin in Germany. She received a doctoral scholarship from the DFG and is part of the research training group `prometei`. Due to her supervisor she is also related to the TU Berlin and Fraunhofer IPK, where she is working as a team member on the Digital Cube Test Center (DCTC). This year she will finish her PhD in the field of virtual and immersive driving environments.

Abstract:

To provide reliable and valid findings while prospective evaluations in the automotive context highly realistic driving environments are recommended. Nowadays, in-car devices are mainly evaluated with driving simulator experiments followed by real car driving studies. Driving simulators are characterized by high internal validity, but lack regarding ecological validity. Real car driving experiments are ecologically valid, but difficult to standardize, more time consuming and expensive. One economizing suggestion is to implement more immersive driving environment when applying driving simulator experiments. This paper discusses research investigating the influence of immersive and non-immersive experimental set ups while performing the Lane Change Task (LCT; ISO, 2008). The task consists of a sequence of lane change maneuvers while driving with a fixed speed of 60 km/h on a three-lane road. Hereby, the immersive mode of visualization (Oculus Rift©) was characterized by stereoscopic 3D view, stereo car sound, 360° head tracking, and approximately 100° field of view. The non-immersive mode of visualization (Laptop) was characterized by 2D view, stereo car sound, no head tracking, and a 75° field of view. Twenty participants took part in the comparative study. Subjective data show advantages regarding presence experience when performing the LCT with the Oculus Rift©, but affect adversely cognitive workload, situation awareness and simulator sickness, compared to a non-immersive PC set up. To sum up, findings of the comparative study lead us to conclude that immersive driving environments are useful to ensure a more realistic impression of the situation, but need to be improved regarding technical issues.

Maik Auricht

Technische Universität Berlin, Germany

Title: Measuring User Experience during a driving simulation with MINARGUS

Time : 11:30 - 11:50

Speaker
Biography:

Maik Auricht has completed his studies at the age of 26 years at the Technische Universitaet Berlin. Currently he is the Chief Engineer at the Chair of Industrial Information Technology. His major research fields are Automotive Engineering, User Experience and Driving Simulation.

Abstract:

Maik Auricht has completed his studies at the age of 26 years at the Technische Universitaet Berlin. Currently he is the Chief Engineer at the Chair of Industrial Information Technology. His major research fields are Automotive Engineering, User Experience and Driving Simulation.

Speaker
Biography:

Ceyla Özgür was born in Antakya/TURKEY in 1983. She is a PhD student and has been working as a specialist at the Automotive Engineering Department of Çukurova University since 2015.

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of SCR System on NOx reduction in heavy duty diesel engine fuelled with diesel and alcohol blends. The experimental tests were conducted in a 6-cylinder, turbocharged heavy duty diesel engine at full load. In the tests diesel, ethanol, methanol and butanol were used as fuel. The alcohol fuel blends were prepared by mixing low sulphur diesel at volumetric rates of between 5 to 15%. The test results showed that SCR system reduce the NOx emissions 42.6% for diesel fuel. The maximum reduction of NOx (43.43%) was achieved with 15% methanol–85% diesel fuel (D85M15) blend.

Speaker
Biography:

Tamar Ben-Bassat has a PhD in Industrial Engineering & Management from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel. For the last 5 years, she is a college professor at SCE – Shamoon College of Engineering - and since 2014 also served as a senior researcher at Israel National Road Safety Authority. Her expertise is in human factors in road safety.

Abstract:

Previous studies showed high and statistically significant correlations between traffic signs comprehension and the signs\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\' compliance with ergonomic guidelines for good design - sign-content compatibility, familiarity, and standardization (e.g., Shinar, 2003; Ben-Bassat and Shinar, 2006). It was found that the sign\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s familiarity had the most substantial effect on comprehension. These findings raised the question as to whether a tourist who drives in a foreign country understands the local signage. This preliminary study was designed to map the differences between Israeli road signs design, based on the Vienna Convention, and American road signs design, based on the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). The signs were distributed into five categories: similar signs (Israeli and American) in all aspects (shape, color and sign-content); similar in shape and color but different in sign-content; similar in sign-content but different in shape and color; different in all aspects; and signs that exist in one country (Israel or USA), but do not exist in the other. The next stage of this study was to rate all signs (Israeli and American) according to two ergonomic principles: sign-content compatibility and standardization. Results of this analysis showed great variability in road signs design. Among Israeli signs that were different from the equivalent American sign, there were signs that were poorly designed in terms of ergonomic principles and therefore it is assumed that non local drivers will find it difficult to understand their meaning. Future study will examine comprehension level of signs from the 5 categories mentioned, among American tourist drivers.

İhsan Uluocak

Çukurova University, Turkey

Title: Dynamic Simulation of Automobile Crankshaft

Time : 12:00 – 12:20

Speaker
Biography:

İhsan Uluocak was born in Istanbul in 1988. He is a PhD student and has been working as a research assistant at the Mechanical Engineering Department of Çukurova University since 2011.

Abstract:

Crankshafts are one of the most important parts of a reciprocating engine. İt basically connects driveline system to the pistons which gives the motion. Main aim of Crankshaft systems designs are to have lower bearing forces, lower torsional vibrations and higher fatigue strength. But, due to complexity of the geometry, lack of manufacturing quality and nonlinear forces, it is hard to analyze the characteristics of the crankshaft. In this paper, a 2D representation of a crankshaft model was built with load information from connecting rods and other specifications. The resultant bearing forces and harmonics of the crankshafts were calculated with given datas. The AVL Excite software program was used to simulate the crankshaft of an engine.

Ali Shaeri

National Iranian Oil Engineering and Construction, Tehran, Iran

Title: Evaluation of the causes of increasing the pressure drop of fixed bed reactor in RCD unit

Time : 12:20 – 12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Ali shaeri is a student in PhD (Passed General Exam) and working in NIOEC as a senior process engineer. He is member of IPS and teaching in the university and member of a Scientific Mission in Elmi- Karbordi University. He was responsible for commissioning and pre-commissioning of process units in Arak Refinery Expansion Project.

Abstract:

The unit of RCD (Reduced Crude Desulfurization) was applied for decreasing of Sulfur, CCR (coradson carbon residue), metals of heavy feeds AR (Atmospheric Residue) and VR (Vacuum Residue), and prepared the feed of RFCC (Reduced Fluid Catalytic Cracking) unit. The unit includes the following parts: 1. Feed Pretreating (Filter) Section 2. Reactor Section 3. Fractionator Section 4. Make-up Hydrogen Compression Section Capacity is 69180 BPSD.These compounds are easily converted to H2S. However, feedstocks containing heteroatomic aromatic molecules are more difficult to process. Desulfurization of these compounds proceeds by initial ring opening and sulfur removal followed by saturation of the resulting olefin. Thiophene is considered 15 times more difficult to process compared to diethylsulfide. There is 5 fix bed reactors used and allowable pressure drop for each reactor is max 0.7 bar approximately. All data is actual and extracted from DCS, we had faced down with more than 7 bar pressure drop in the 2nd reactor. This paper discussed about what was actual happening.

Speaker
Biography:

Erinç ULUDAMAR was born in Adana/TURKEY in 1986. He is a PhD student and has been working as a research assistant at the Mechanical Engineering Department of Çukurova University since 2010.

Abstract:

Biodiesel is one of the most popular alternative fuel. The usage of biodiesel is increasing day by day. Therefore, all effects of biodiesel on internal combustion engines must be known. In this study, vibration effect of canola (rapeseed), sunflower biodiesel and their blends with low sulphur diesel fuel was investigated. Fuels were tested in a four cylinder four stroke diesel engine at 1300, 1600, 1900, 2200, 2500 and 2800 rpm engine speed. The results showed that with the use of biodiesel blend with low sulphur diesel fuel up to 40% proportions, vibration values get significantly lower at all engine speeds. The least vibration value for most of the fuel was observed with the use of 60% biodiesel blend. The results were also individually interpreted in longitude, vertical and lateral axes.

Ahmet Serdar Önal

Beyçelik Gestamp, Turkey

Title: Crash behavior of telescopic crash box with aluminum foam

Time : 15:40 – 16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Ahmet Serdar Önal received BSc. degree in mechanical engineering from Pamukkale University and MSc. Degree in mechanical engineering from Uludağ University. He is a PhD Candidate at the Mechanical Engineering Department of Uludağ University, Engineering Faculty. He is interested in the subject of hot stamping process (PHD), industrial waste heat recovery systems based on ORC, %100 quality control systems, electrical resistance welding of boron alloyed steels, production line optimisation, crashworthiness optimization of energy absorption structures. Mr. Önal has currently been working as a R&D New Technology Engineer at the Beyçelik Gestamp R&D Center, Bursa/TURKEY.

Abstract:

The objective of this paper is to improve the energy absorption performance of crash box that are placed behind the bumper in automotive vehicles. In order to maximize the absorbed energy, new telescopic box geometry with aluminum foam-filled is introduced. Impact progressive collapse behaviors of the two boxes were simulated using the explicit finite element code, Ls-Dyna. Impact behaviors and energy absorption capacity of empty and foam filled telescopic boxes were compared. It is numerically observed that the telescopic crash box is not easily folded and absorbs impact energy similarly to the conventional one. Also, numerical simulation shows that in terms of achieving maximum energy absorption, telescopic crash geometry and filling the box with aluminum foam can be preferable to thickening the box wall. Finally, it is found that energy absorption capacity of telescopic crash box with aluminum foam is % 47 higher than the empty box.

Speaker
Biography:

Chih-Wei Pai is Assistant professor at Taipei Medical University TaiwanHospital & Health Care. Publications autherised by CHIH-WEI PAI 1.Exploring motorcycle red-light violation in response to pedestrian green signal countdown device. 2.Cyclists' red-light running behaviours: an examination of risk-taking, opportunistic, and law-obeying behaviours. 3.Motorcyclists violating hook-turn area at intersections in Taiwan: an observational study. 4.Automobile drivers' willingness to pay for moving violation behaviour--compared to motorcyclists.

Abstract:

Using A1 A2 police-reported accident data for years 2003 – 2010 in Taiwan, the paper examines anatomic injuries and crash characteristics specific to pedestrians in “facing traffic” and “back to traffic” crashes. There were 2768 and 7558 accidents involving pedestrians walking along with/against traffic respectively. Injuries sustained by pedestrians and crash characteristics in these two crash types were compared with those in other crash types (nearside crash, nearside dart-out crash, offside crash, offside dart-out crash). Main findings include that “back to traffic” crashes resulted in more severe injuries, and pedestrians in “back to traffic” crashes had increased head, neck, and spine injuries than those in other crash types; and there was an elevated risk of head injuries in unlit darkness and NBU (non built-up) roadways. Several crash features (e.g., unlit darkness, overtaking maneuvers, phone use by pedestrians and drivers, intoxicated drivers) appear to be over-involved in “back to traffic” crashes. The implications of the research findings regarding pedestrian/driver education, enforcement, and remedial engineering design are discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Ali Can YILMAZ graduated from Istanbul University Dept. of Mechanical Engineering in 2007. He has completed his MSc education in Cukurova University, Dept. of Automotive Engineering and he is currently PhD student in the same university and department. Combustion in engines, alternative fuels, renewable energy systems and traffic accident reconstruction are some of the interested study fields of him.

Abstract:

There are some deficiencies in defining fault rates in \\\"No.2918 Turkish Highway Traffic Act\\\" in Turkey. Fault rates are determined according to initiative of accident experts (sometimes no speed analyses of vehicles, just procession of accident) and there are no specific quantitative instructions on fault rates related to procession of accident in act. Mostly, only consistence situation of accident does not yield adequate data in determining fault rate. The most important parameters for determination of fault rates are the speeds of vehicles which correspond to more comprehensive parameter, Energy Equivalent Speed (EES). In this study, data collected from accident scene (police reports, skid marks, deformation situation of involvements, crush depth etc.) were inserted properly into the software called “vCrash” which is able to simulate the accident scene in 2D and 3D. Then, 784 parameters, related to calculating EES with a prediction error, were prepared according to several accidents. These parameters were also used as teaching data for the Multi-layer Feed Forward Neural Network (MFFNN) and Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) models in order to predict EES values of involvements, which give idea about severity and dissipation of deformation energy corresponding to the observed vehicle residual crush and finally fault rates, without requirement of performing simulation for probable accidents in future. Using 10-fold cross validation on the dataset, standard error of estimates (SEE) and multiple correlation coefficients (R) of both models are calculated. The GRNN-based model yields lower SEE whereas the MFFNN-based model yields higher R. Assuming a fault rate scale, fault rates of involvements were determined based on predicted EES values of involvements. Every predetermined increment in EES of specific involvement was deemed as a specific increment in fault rate of the same involvement to carry out a systematic and scientific approach.

Erinç Uludamar

Çukurova University, Turkey

Title: Finite Element Analysis of Electric Bike Rims Coupled with Hub Motor

Time : 16:40 – 17:00

Speaker
Biography:

Erinç ULUDAMAR was born in Adana/TURKEY in 1986. He is a PhD student and has been working as a research assistant at the Mechanical Engineering Department of Çukurova University since 2010.

Abstract:

In this study, static and fatigue analysis of three different electrical bikes’ rim which are coupled with electrical hub motor is investigated. Loading conditions were applied on rim in order to simulate driving forces that exert on road conditions. Analysis results of three rims were compared with each other. According to results, sharp edges increase von-Mises stresses and decrease fatigue safety factor due to stress concentration on the corners. Also, it was observed that contact area of spokes to flange affects the total deformation and von-Mises stress distribution. Three dimensional models of the rims were designed with the aid of CATIA V5 and their computational analyses were carried out with ANSYS WORKBENCH software program.