Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Automobile Engineering Berlin, Germany.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Lara A Carlson

University of New England, Maine, USA

Keynote: Hydration Status and Thermoregulatory Responses in Drivers During Competitive Racing

Time : 10:00-10:40

OMICS International Automobile 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lara A Carlson photo
Biography:

Dr. Lara Carlson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of New England. Carlson also has a faculty appointment with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Outside the classroom, Carlson was an U.S. ranked hammer thrower qualifying for four USA Outdoor Track and Field National Championships. Carlson is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, a recipient of the New England ACSM (NEACSM) Honor Award, and was elected President of the NEACSM for an unprecedented second term in their history. Her research interests include the effects of exercise on immune responses, and motorsports physiology.

Abstract:

Stock car drivers are exposed to high ambient temperatures prior to-, and during competition, further complicated by the fact that they are encapsulated in protective clothing; however, the hydration status of these drivers has not been determined. Purpose: To quantify the degree of fluid losses during a competitive event in hot conditions. Methods: Nine male stock car drivers (30  9 yr, 178  3 cm, 83  19 kg) were studied during a Pro Series Division NASCAR race. Sweat rate (SR) and dehydration was determined via nude body weights (BW) pre- and post-race. SR calculations included ~40 min of pre-race activity and ~20 min or racing. Results: Urine loss was considered fluid loss and BW was corrected for fluid and food intake. Pre-race BW was 81.5  18.5 kg and decreased to 81.1  18.5 kg post-race (p=0.001). BW loss post-race was 0.77  0.3% and average sweat rate was 0.63  0.4 L• h-1. Intestinal core increased from 38.0  0.4oC to 38.5  0.4oC post-race (p=0.001). Skin temperature increased from 35.8  0.8oC 36.9  0.8oC post-race (p=0.001), whereas the core-to-skin temperature gradient narrowed from 2.2  0.9oC to 1.6  0.9oC, pre to post-race (p=0.001). Heart rates (HR) post-race were 89  0.0% of the drivers’ age-predicted maximum HR. Conclusion: Fluid losses during competitive racing can be significant, particularly when SR is extrapolated to longer duration events. Without a fluid replacement strategy, fluid losses for these drivers may exceed 3% BW and could negatively impact driving performance.

OMICS International Automobile 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kyongsu Yi photo
Biography:

Koungsu Yi received his BS and MS degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Seoul National University, Korea, in 1985 and 1987, respectively, and PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1992. He is a Professor at the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Seoul National University, Korea. He currently serves as a member of the editorial boards of the KSME, IJAT, and ICROS journals. His research interests include Control Systems, Driver Assistant Systems and Active Safety Systems of ground vehicles.

Abstract:

With a significant progress in sensors, actuators and other technologies for automotive vehicle, numerous safety systems have been active topics of automotive research area. And, in particular, the main challenges lie in active safety systems which are expected to reduce the risk of accidents, improve safety and enhance comfort and performance for drivers. Some of these active safety systems have been already commercialized include Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), Electronic Stability Control (ESC), LaneDeparture Warning (LDW), Lane Keeping Support (LKS), Lane Change Assist (LCA) and Collision Mitigation Systems (CMS). Current automotive safety systems can be grouped by in which driving state it occurs. Vehicle driving states can be described by following sequential five states: normal driving state, warning state, crash avoidable state, crash unavoidable state, and post event state. The first three states focus on accident avoidance, while the last three states focus on damage mitigation (with an overlap of the third state). Using the above sequential driving state flow, it is apparent that automotive safety concerns should be addressed with an integrated system approach. Accordingly, as the next generation of the active safety systems, current safety systems on vehicles are becoming integrated and merging so that each system interacts with the other. Therefore, the core of the integrated automotive safety system can be summarized as a threat assessment and decision making method which defines the current driving state of safety and makes the control decision. Various situation assessment methods have been studied previously by many researchers . Generally, the driving situation assessment consists of the following three steps: an estimation of current driving states, a prediction of future driving states and an evaluation of collision risk or their collision type. The current stages of risk metrics are mainly based on the predicted time at which some predefined risky event occurs. The typical predicted time based indices include the time to collision (TTC) or time to impact. Polychronopoulos et al. proposed the predicted time to minimum distance with sensor fusion method. Time to react which means the last point to decelerate or accelerate or steer to avoid the predicted collision has been proposed and analyzed . Berthelot et al. presented an algorithm to compute the probability distribution of TTC induced by an uncertain system input and thus allows to use TTC as a more robust and reliable probabilistic activation condition. Brannstorm et al. estimated perimeter of the object and the set of maneuvers that the host driver can use to avoid a collision. This set of maneuvers is then assessed to determine if the driver needs immediate assistance to avoid or mitigate an accident.

  • Automotive Engine | Automotive Vehicles and Design Technology | Automotive Safety | Emerging Trends in Automotive Engineering | Automotive Industry | Braking System | Vehicular Automation and Automatic Driving
Location: Best Western Premier, Airporthotel Fontane Berlin
Speaker

Chair

Benoit Boulet

McGill University, Canada

Speaker

Co-Chair

Koungsu Yi

Seoul National University, South Korea

Session Introduction

Jana Dittmann

Otto von Guericke University of Magdeburg, Germany

Title: Automotive cyber security trends and the impact to forensic readiness

Time : 11:40-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Jana Dittmann has her expertise in Multimedia And Security Research. As a leader of the working group on multimedia and security, she has years of experience Research, Evaluation, Teaching and Administration with a special focus on the holistic evaluation of IT-security, including embedded systems of which automotivesystems are a prime example. Under her leadership, a model of the forensic process was established that is capable of identifying potential sources of data and which can aid in their integrity and authenticity preserving acquisition, investigation, analysis and documentation.

Abstract:

Modern cars are complex systems incorporating a wide range of actuators, sensors, ECUs (Electronic Control Units) and the means of connecting these components in order to implement basic functionality as well as advanced driver assistance systems. Generally, the firmware powering the ECUs is closed-source, which poses a serious challenge for investigators with the aim of event reconstruction. Several measures are taken by the manufacturers in order to prevent reverse engineering. This is mostly due to intellectual property protection but is also hindering or even preventing a successful investigation. With the growing interconnectivity between vehicles and their surroundings (both visible/easily identifiable such as cables and sockets and hidden channels, e.g. using the mobile phone/eCall subsystem for telemetrics) new possibilities and new attack vectors arise. Attacks on in-vehicle systems might aim at undermining the privacy of the user but might as well, given the fast-paced environment in which vehicles operate, and aim at the safety of occupants and bystanders. While various research, including the prevention and event reconstruction of such attacks, is being done on these security issues at the current time new challenges loom on the horizon. (Semi)autonomous vehicles carry a host of so far unanswered questions with them – like of the responsibility for a crash caused by a (Semi)autonomous vehicle. Discussing the deep ethical and legal implications of such a question is beyond the scope of this talk. Instead we want to focus on the question which impact (Semi-)autonomous vehicles and their growing interconnectivity have on the ability of a forensic investigator to determine the course of action and the root-causes of incidents involving modern day vehicles.

Benoit Boulet

McGill University, Canada

Title: Development of multispeed ratio drivetrains for electric vehicles

Time : 12:15-12:50

Speaker
Biography:

Benoit Boulet is an Associate Dean (Research & Innovation) of the Faculty of Engineering at McGill University and an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He has completed his Bachelor's degree from Université Laval in 1990, and Master of Engineering degree from McGill University in 1992, and a PhD degree from the University of Toronto in 1996, all in electrical engineering. He is a registered Professional Engineer in the province of Québec. He is a member of the McGill Centre for Intelligent Machines and his research areas include the design and control of electric vehicles and green energy systems, robust control of biomedical systems, and robust industrial control.

Abstract:

As the story goes, Tesla tried to develop a two-speed ratio transmission for its Roadster around 2007. But after a series of failures that delayed production and almost tanked the company, a decision was made to use a single-speed-ratio transmission. Tesla’s ensued success with single-speed-ratio drivetrains, also adopted by other electric car manufacturers, leads to the question: Is there a need for multispeed drivetrains in electric vehicles? If so, for what class of vehicles? Is it economical? Our research has shown that the electrification of vehicles larger than class 3 is where multispeed transmissions may be considered, but perhaps not currently for smaller vehicles, apart for high-performance race cars or GTs. The cost question, while crucial in the automotive industry, is very difficult to settle for a new electric powertrain design because the production volumes are still very small. Given a set of performance specs for the vehicle, and assuming peak power is not the main constraint, is it better to choose a larger motor and power inverter for a single-speed-ratio architecture, or to select a smaller inverter and motor coupled to a two-speed transmission? To help resolve this question, we studied the cost-reliability-performance of EV powertrains to come up with formulas that could be used in a design optimization trading off the cost of the powertrain versus its performance and reliability. On the performance side, we designed a two-speed clutch-less automated manual transmission (AMT) and tested it on a compact electric car for dynamometer and road testing. Then, we studied friction in the synchromesh of an AMT to design a feedback controller for the synchronizer’s cone clutch. This was done to control friction at a favourable location in the mixed lubrication regime on the Stribeck curve that maximizes torque transfer while minimizing wear during gear shifts. A new type of two-speed transmission was also designed to alleviate the torque dip of the AMT while avoiding the use of a clutch. The resulting patented Dual Brake Transmission (DBT) has shown promise for high efficiency, high torque and smooth operation of EVs.

Speaker
Biography:

Jorge Varela Barreras has completed his Postdoctral degree in Engineering Science at University of Oxford, UK, with interests in novel electric vehicle concepts and lithium-ion battery modeling, simulation, emulation, iagnostics, prognostics and management. He pursued his PhD in Battery Management at Aalborg University, Denmark, where he also received MSc degree in Power Electronics. Previously, he received MSc degree in Electrical Engineering from University of Vigo, Spain, where he co-founded a photovoltaic consulting company. He is a founder member of the Danish Battery Society and the representative of the Oxford Research Staff Society in the Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford. He serves in the Editorial Board of Frontiers in Energy Research. He has been a Guest Lecturer at University Carlos III (2016), Aalborg University (2014-16) and, Faculty of engineering of University of Porto (2015), University of Sfax (2016). From 2017,he is the major Lecturer in Engineering at the Oxford Tradition academic program, held in Pembroke College and Corpus Christi College.

Abstract:

A lithium-ion battery pack consists of a number of cells in a series-parallel arrangement. The series connection, like in any chain, makes the performance limited by the weakest cell. If the cells were identical, this would not be a problem. However, there are cell-to-cell differ  ences, which increase over battery lifetime, that lead to limited electrical performance and uneven temperature distributions. Nowadays, automotive industry overcomes this problem in the design of battery packs for Electric Vehicles partially by adopting the so-called passive balancing systems. These systems carry out selective discharge of cells during battery charging, allowing all the cells to be fully-charged at the end-of-charge. Thus, losses in useful capacity related to differences in initial stateof- charge are compensated. Active balancing systems have also been proposed. They conduct selective dis/charge of cells during dis/charging, allowing all cells to be always at a similar state-of-charge level. Thus, losses in useful capacity related to differences in state-of-charge at any time are minimized. However, they do not get the full endorsement of automotive industry, which usually considers the partial advantages offered to be insufficient to justify the extra costs and complexity. Our research aims to bring aparadigm shift, by improving the design and control of these systems. The goal is to overcome not some, but all the problems related with cell-to-cell variations, by developing a smart balancing system (SBS) that makes the performance of any battery pack virtually ideal. The SBS transfers the energy between cells in such a smart way that the temperatures are minimized and equalized, and the electrical performance is optimized, in terms of losses, power capability and useful capacity. Potential advantages in Electric Vehicle performance include extended driving range, extended operation without de-rating the max. available power and longer battery lifespan.

P.V. Aravind

Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Title: Car as Power Plant: SOFC-PEMFC integrated high efficiency transportation systems

Time : 13:25-14:00

Speaker
Biography:

PV Aravind is an Associate Professor at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands (Faculty of Mechanical,Maritime and Materials Engineering). He teaches  courses on Thermodynamics of Energy Conversion and Fuel Cell Systems. He also teaches at Technical University Munich in Germany and contributes to a course at KU Leuven in Belgium. He is/was involved in several national, European and international energy related research projects focusing on fuel cell systems. Currently, he supervises a team of ten PhD students, three Postdoctoral Researchers and several MSc students. He is a member of the International Energy Agency SOFC Annex and is also in the steering committee of European Energy Research Alliance for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells.

Abstract:

Automobile industry is expected to change significantly in the coming years and decades. A convenient, technically and economically viable and environmentally friendly transportation system for the future needs to be developed. This requires a comparison between different technical choices based on best possible designs achievable. The role of hydrogen and fuel cells in the future transportation systems is being widely debated. As they are getting continuously compared with other possible options, for example with battery vehicles, it is necessary that efficient system concepts for fuel cell based transportation systems are developed.In this paper, we present an approach to increase the efficiencies while using different fuels for  ransportation applications, by making use of different types of fuel cells. A concept is presented in which a high temperature fuel cell is used as an electricity producing fuel reformer, in this case a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and low temperature fuel cells onboard for vehicle propulsion, in this case Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). A trigeneration system fed with natural gas and capable of producing electricity, heat, and hydrogen is proposed. Two modes are presented: a Car as Power Plant (CaPP) mode, in which fuel cell electric vehicles(FCEVs) act as energy and water producers while parked; and a pump mode, in which compressed hydrogen is produced and pumped to the vehicle’s fuel tank. Different reforming options are presented and compared, a catalytic reformer (CR), and a solid oxide fuel cell operating as reformer (SOFCR). Additionally, the option of integrating carbon capture and storage (CCS) is also presented. Results indicate that the SOFCR unit significantly reduces the energy destruction resulting a trigeneration energy efficiency of around 60%. Additionally, a brief presentation on applying the concept for other types of vehicles also is presented.

Siniša Šegvić

University of Zagreb, Croatia

Title: Pixel-level image understanding for smart and autonomous vehicles

Time : 14:40-15:15

Speaker
Biography:

Siniša Šegvić completed his PhD degree in 2004 at the University of Zagreb. He has spent one year as a Postdoctoral Researcher at IRISA Rennes in 2006 and another year as a Postdoctoral Researcher at TU Graz in 2007. Currently, he is an Associate Professor at University of Zagreb. He is a program committee member of the VISAPP 2018 conference and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Computing and Information Technology. His research expertise is in the field of computer vision and deep learning, with special interest in applications for safe traffic. He published more than 50 national and international scientific papers

Abstract:

Semantic segmentation performs pixel-level image understanding by associating each image pixel with a meaningful class such as 'road', 'terrain', 'sidewalk' or 'person'. The resulting semantic map reveals the kind of surface terrain in front of the vehicle, and may be used to recover the traversability map required for motion planning. This capability makes semantic segmentation one of t he most important computer vision tasks in the automotive context. Today, state of the art semantic segmentation results are obtained with deep end-to-end trained convolutional models. However, direct application of popular and well understood image classification architectures would lead to poor semantic segmentation performance. The main obstacles are large variation of object scale, and strict memory limitations of contemporary GPUs. Recent works overcome these obstacles by careful architectural adaptations. As a result high semantic segmentation accuracy today can be achieved on large images in real-time, while more training data would likely further improve the results. Specifications of upcoming embedded hardware platforms promise low-power real-time onboardope ration and provide directions for exciting real-world applications.

Speaker
Biography:

H Can Koman works in Interior Quietness department of Ford Otosan, a joint venture to Ford motor company. His main work is focused on Aero-Acoustics, both experimental and computational. He has worked on light and heavy commercial vehicle projects from scratch to finish to deliver vehicles that would meet targeted customer expectations for flow related interior cabin noise.

Abstract:

As the powertrain noise of motor vehicles get silent, customers complain more of flow related noise (called wind noise in the industry) that is especially dominant at highway speeds. In order to produce silent vehicles, engineers need to make critical decisions at very early design phase to optimize the shape of the vehicle for least Aeroacoustic excitation. This poses a problem asexperimental methods are still dominant at this field and there is no physical bucks to conduct wind tunnel tests with at early design phaes. Moreover, companies that do not have a wind tunnel of their own face both financial and timing problems to conduct wind tunn l tests at outside facilities. For these reasons, applying computational methods to predict wind noise level over the side glass of a vehicle will help engineers to take actions at the very start of the design phase and decrease the amount of time that needs to be spent in the wind tunnel. This study aims at developing a reliable CFD based aero-acoustic simulation methodology for motor vehicles.Reliability of the methodology is tested by comparing calculation results with wind tunnel test results, which is done in two steps: In step one overall pressure fluctuations on the side glass of a light commercial vehicle are calculated and compared to the results of wind tunnel tests conducted with surface microphones. In step two: wooden obstacles are placed on a pillar of the same vehicle. Difference of surface pressure fluctuations on the side glass between base condition and the condition with the obstacle is both computationally calculated and tested in the wind tunnel. Two results are compared to understand methodology’s prediction capability for exterior surface changes.

Speaker
Biography:

Khaled R Asfar is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at JUST University. He received his MSc and PhD degrees from Virginia Tech in 1980. He was a visitingscholar in Aerospace Engineering at Texas A & M University (2007-2008), and a visiting Professor at the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University (2008-2010). He is the founder of The Center of Excellence for Innovative Projects and The Technological Incubator at JUST University. He received many scientific honors and awards such as the Hisham Hijjawi Award in 1995 and 2001, JUST Award for Scientific Distinction in 1997 and 2006, and the Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship in 1991-1992. He has published numerous articles in several fields and holds three US Patents and two US patent pending applications. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Vibration and Control, and editorial boards of three other journals.

Abstract:

In this work, an electro-mechanical direction sensor was designed and developed. The purpose of this electro-mechanical direction sensor is to measure the change in the heading angle for a wheeled ground vehicle. The mechanism used in our designed sensor is inspired from the ancient Chinese piece of mechanical art; The South Pointing Chariot. The south pointing chariot uses mechanical gears in a special arrangement in order to maintain a figure/pointer pointing to a fixed direction, whatever the chariot direction is The mechanical part of the South Pointing Chariot has been integrated with an electronic circuit to form the electro-mechanical direction sensor. The designed sensor can be used for vehicle guidance and control. The measured data of the electro-mechanical direction sensor has been compared to magnetic compass readings to validate its output. A test to drive a vehicle in a predefined path was performed using the feedback of the electro-mechanical direction sensor. The results showed good performance of the electromechanical direction sensor in measuring the change in the heading angle for a 3-wheeled vehicle and controlling it.

Speaker
Biography:

Mazin Abed Mohammed has his expertise in evaluation and optimization in improving the healthcare and optimization problems. He is a PhD candidate in Biomedical Computing and Engineering Technologies at Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Malaysia. He received his BSc in Computer Science from College of Computer, University of Anbar, Iraq in 2008. He obtained his MSc in Information Technology from College of Graduate Studies, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Malaysia, in 2011. His current research interests include Artificial Intelligence, Biomedical Computing, Multimedia Applications and Optimization Methods..

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) has various applications in real life. It illuminates in a wide field of transportation and  distribution, for example, transportation of people and things, movement service and garbage gathering.Subsequently, a proper choosing of vehicle routing has a broad impact factor to enhance the financial interests and fittingness of coordination’s planning. In this study the problem is as follows: have a number of vehicles which are used for transporting applications to instance place. Each vehicle starts from a main location at different times every day. The vehicle picks up applications from start locations to the instance place in many different routes and return back to the start location in at specific times every day, starting from early morning until the end of official working hours, on the following conditions: (1) Every location will be visited once in each route, and (2) The capacity of each vehicle is enough for all applications included in each route. Objectives: The proposed study attempt to find an optimal route results for VRP of any VRP using artificial intelligence methods. To achieve an optimal solution for VRP of VRP with the accompanying goals: To reduce the time consuming and distance for all routes.Which leads to the speedy transportation of customers to their locations, to reduce the transportation costs such as fuel utilization and additionally the vehicle upkeep costs, to implement the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (CVRP) model for optimizing shuttle bus services. To implement the algorithm which can be used and applied for any problems in the like of VRP. Method: The Approach has been proposed based on two phases: firstly, find the shortest route for VRP to help anyorganization toreduce customer’s transportation costs by artificial intelligence methods is proposed to solve this problem as it is capable of solving many complex problems; secondly, identify The CVRP model is proposed for optimizing shuttle bus services. Finding: The findings outcome from this study have shown that: (1) A comprehensive listed of active artificial intelligence methods in solving vehicle routing problem for best transportation and distribution solutions; (2) Identified and established an evaluation criterion for artificial intelligence methods in solving vehicle routing problem for best transportation and distribution solutions; (3) Highlight the methods, based on hybrid crossover operation, for selecting the best route (4) artificial intelligence methods capable a shorter distance for routes. The proportion of reduction the distance for each route is relatively short, but the saving s in the distance becomes greater when calculating the total distances travelled by all buses daily or monthly. This applies also to the time factor thathas been reduced slightly based on the rate of reduction in the distances of the routes.

Sunil Pathak

Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Malaysia

Title: Effects of Various Parameters of Micro-Geometry on Performance Characteristics of Gears

Time : 17:15-17:40

Speaker
Biography:

Sunil Pathak is specialized in gear engineering and advanced and hybrid manufacturing processes. He has been working in the field of gear engineering since last 7 years and advanced manufacturing and surface engineering over 5 years. He has conducted extensive research on advanced finishing of gears. He possesses specialized skills in gear finishing, gear metrology (micro, and macro-geometry) and measurement of gear accuracy. Presently he has been working in developing cold spray coatings as sustainable process for manufacturing of 3D additive manufacturing components and repair/remanufacturing engineering where he has specially gained experience in materials and remanufacturing engineering. He is also working on machining of difficult-to- machine materials using advanced machining processes such as EDM and WEDM. Dr. Pathak has published more than 15 International Journal Papers, 3 Book Chapters and 4 research articles in the proceedings of the international and national conferences

Abstract:

Gear is one of the most important mechanical elements, possibly even surpassing the wheel, of human civilization which is used to transmit motion and/or power mechanically and positively (i.e. without slip) with and without change in the direction and speed of rotation by the successive engagements of teeth cut on their periphery. Performance characteristics of a gear include its load carrying capacity, service life, operating performance, surface characteristics, wear characteristics, transmission characteristics and noise generation characteristics. All these are significantly affected by the surface characteristics of a gear which has two major components namely (i) surface quality which includes surface finish, micro-geometry (i.e. form and location errors), tooth flank topology and wear characteristics; and (ii) surface integrity aspects. The aim of the present work is discuss the effects of various parameters of micro-geometry on performance characteristics of a gear. Micro-geometry of a gear is evaluated in terms of form error and location error. Total profile error and total lead error are two components of form error while pitch error and run out are considered as two components of location error. Higher values of form error and location error in a gear lower its load carrying capacity and increases noise and errors in motion transfer during its use. In this paper authors presents a detailed description on the effects of micro-geometry parameters on performance of gears and also presents possible solution to avoid these flaws for noiseless and smooth performance of gears.